Yakama Nation Fisheries Projects

Industrial and agricultural pollution and toxic contamination, dams that block fish migration and access to spawning habitat—the decline of salmon, steelhead, sturgeon, and lamprey in the Columbia River is has many causes. To restore the river and the life that depends upon it, the Yakama Nation Fisheries is employing many and varied strategies, simultaneously. In some areas, habitat recovery is the key; in others, supplementation of salmon runs may need to be the driver.

Last updated: Fri, 05/06/2016

This report presents the findings of the Nason Creek Recreation Assessment.  The goal of this study is to support the work of the Yakama Nation and partners as they continue to seek ways to balance the ecological benefits of habitat restoration pr

Last updated: Fri, 01/08/2016

The White-headed Woodpecker (Picoides albolarvatus) is a primary excavator that occurs in pine- (Pinus spp.) dominated habitats throughout its geographic distribution.

Last updated: Thu, 05/14/2015

 This project entails placing large woody material (LWM) along the mainstem Upper Wenatchee River in crib-like structures.  The length of the treatment will be for approximately 100 yds.

Last updated: Tue, 01/27/2015

We studied the nest-site characteristics of Western Bluebirds nesting in natural tree cavities in burned and unburned logged ponderosa pine forests along the east-slope of the Cascade Range of Washington, 2003–2008 and 2010. We compared 13 bluebir

Last updated: Wed, 01/14/2015

This project expands research, monitoring, and evaluation (RM&E) activities conducted by the co-managers in the Yakima Basin (Yakama Nation and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife-WDFW) to better evaluate viable salmonid population (VSP

Last updated: Wed, 01/14/2015

To restore sustainable and harvestable populations of salmon, steelhead, and other at-risk species, the YKFP is evaluating all stocks historically present in the Yakima and Klickitat Subbasins and, using principles of adaptive management, is apply

Last updated: Wed, 01/14/2015

Columbia River steelhead are iteroparous (able to spawn multiple times). However, as post-spawned steelhead (kelts) attempt to migrate downstream to return to the ocean, their survival is adversely affected by major dams.

Last updated: Tue, 09/23/2014

This fish habitat enhancement project recreates habitat that is below historical and potential conditions.

Last updated: Wed, 09/17/2014

Summer- and fall-run chinook were once abundant in the Yakima River Basin, but the runs were decimated as a result of historical land and water development and fisheries management practices.