Yakama Nation Fisheries Projects

Industrial and agricultural pollution and toxic contamination, dams that block fish migration and access to spawning habitat—the decline of salmon, steelhead, sturgeon, and lamprey in the Columbia River is has many causes. To restore the river and the life that depends upon it, the Yakama Nation Fisheries is employing many and varied strategies, simultaneously. In some areas, habitat recovery is the key; in others, supplementation of salmon runs may need to be the driver.

Last updated: Thu, 05/01/2014

The Western Bluebird (Sialia mexicana) is a secondary-cavity-nesting thrush that breeds in semi-open habitats throughout much of western North America.

Last updated: Thu, 04/10/2014

In Washington, the White-headed Woodpecker (Picoides albolarvatus) is listed as a species of concern because of its association with old-growth ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forests. In 2011, we began a color-marking study of

Last updated: Tue, 02/25/2014

Xapnish Property - Toppenish Creek

Last updated: Tue, 01/07/2014

The 8 Mile Ranch Project (8 Mile Ranch) restores habitat and hydraulic refuge for fish rearing and holding within one reach of the Chewuch River.

Last updated: Fri, 11/01/2013

Woodpeckers are considered keystone species because of their broad effects on other species.

Last updated: Fri, 11/01/2013

Evaluating rates of nestling provisioning by adult birds provides insight into foraging strategies and reproductive effort. In most biparental avian species, both males and females provision the young, although this task is not always shared equal

Last updated: Mon, 10/21/2013

Yakama Reservation Watersheds Project

Last updated: Wed, 09/18/2013

Yakama Nation Fisheries (Owner) is conducting a material procurement and hauling contract for an in-stream salmon habitat restoration project along the Entiat River known as the Lower Entiat RM 2.6-3.5 Habitat Enhancement Project.  This contract i

Last updated: Thu, 08/29/2013
Last updated: Thu, 08/29/2013

The Chewuch River Mile 10 Fish Habitat Enhancement Project (RM10), improves stream complexity by improving available instream habitat, increasing side channel and off channel habitat, and stabalizing eroding banks.