In partnership with:

United States Forest Service

Yakima Basin "Wood Fiesta"

The Yakima Basin "Wood Fiesta" Helicopter Aquatic Restoration project is a multi-watershed collaborative effort aimed at enhancing aquatic habitat in remote watersheds that have been greatly altered by past management practices.  Large wood will be placed in stream and on the floodplain of seven Yakima River tributaries using a helicopter to improve habitat for native fish species.  The projects are located in remote areas where terrain and or vegetation limits the use of ground-based equipment to place large wood.  More information on these projects and associated temporar

Western Bluebird Nest-site Characteristics in Managed Ponderosa Pine Forests

We studied the nest-site characteristics of Western Bluebirds nesting in natural tree cavities in burned and unburned logged ponderosa pine forests along the east-slope of the Cascade Range of Washington, 2003–2008 and 2010. We compared 13 bluebird nest-site habitat variables between burned and unburned stands by assessing overlap in 95% CI.

Columbia Basin Toxics Cleanup

The Yakama Nation is a federally recognized Tribe, pursuant to the Treaty of 1855 (12 Stat. 951), with authority to manage, protect and restore treaty resources throughout the Pacific Northwest. The Columbia River is frequently referred to and honored as "the life blood of the Yakama Nation." Currently, the Columbia River is a polluted and life-threatening environment for salmon and other aquatic resources primarily because of industrial development.

Twisp River Cattle Management

The Twisp River Cattle Management Project provides riparian protection for Upper Columbia Steelhead in the Twisp River Watershed. The project was done on federal lands in partnership with the United States Forest Service (USFS).

Chewuch River 8 Mile Ranch Project

The 8 Mile Ranch Project (8 Mile Ranch) restores habitat and hydraulic refuge for fish rearing and holding within one reach of the Chewuch River. The work performed provides fish habitat, stream complexity and restores a functional riparian zone in an area currently without any vegetation.

Assessing Yearly Survival of White-headed Woodpeckers in Managed Ponderosa Pine Stands

In Washington, the White-headed Woodpecker (Picoides albolarvatus) is listed as a species of concern because of its association with old-growth ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forests. In 2011, we began a color-marking study of White-headed Woodpeckers in managed stands dominated by ponderosa pine. We captured adult birds with mist nets, hoop nets, and noose traps at nest cavities and water features. We did this by using call playbacks in conjunction with a taxidermy mounted female White-headed Woodpecker.

Woodpecker Nest Survival in Managed Ponderosa Pine Forests

Woodpeckers are considered keystone species because of their broad effects on other species. In nesting and foraging, woodpeckers create cavities and excavations that other species use, they aid in controlling forest insects, and they may help in dispersing spores of fungi that are agents of decay. Despite the importance of woodpeckers to forested ecosystems, few studies have examined metrics of woodpecker demography such as reproductive success or nest survival or have investigated the associations of habitat characteristics with these or related metrics.