Yakama Nation Fisheries Projects

Industrial and agricultural pollution and toxic contamination, dams that block fish migration and access to spawning habitat—the decline of salmon, steelhead, sturgeon, and lamprey in the Columbia River is has many causes. To restore the river and the life that depends upon it, the Yakama Nation Fisheries is employing many and varied strategies, simultaneously. In some areas, habitat recovery is the key; in others, supplementation of salmon runs may need to be the driver.

Last updated: Thu, 06/06/2019

The Yakama Nation Upper Columbia Habitat Restoration Program has completed an assessment of site conditions and potential restoration p

Last updated: Thu, 03/08/2018

This page is intended to provide restricted access to Intergovernmental Master Agreement 56662 ("IG-MA 56662") and associated modifications for contractors and consultants doing business with the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation.

Last updated: Thu, 02/15/2018

The Yakama Nation requests qualifications (RFQ) from engineering and consulting firms to accomplish the work elements outlined in this Request for Qualifications (RFQ) and provide technical assistance to support YNF’s work on cleaning up and resto

Last updated: Tue, 02/06/2018

The Yakama Nation Upper Columbia Habitat Restoration Project (URCHRP) is a project under the Yakama Nation Fisheries Resource Management Program. The project recieves its principal funding through the Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

Last updated: Fri, 05/06/2016

This report presents the findings of the Nason Creek Recreation Assessment.  The goal of this study is to support the work of the Yakama Nation and partners as they continue to seek ways to balance the ecological benefits of habitat restoration pr

Last updated: Wed, 01/14/2015

To restore sustainable and harvestable populations of salmon, steelhead, and other at-risk species, the YKFP is evaluating all stocks historically present in the Yakima and Klickitat Subbasins and, using principles of adaptive management, is apply

Last updated: Wed, 01/14/2015

Columbia River steelhead are iteroparous (able to spawn multiple times). However, as post-spawned steelhead (kelts) attempt to migrate downstream to return to the ocean, their survival is adversely affected by major dams.

Last updated: Wed, 09/17/2014

Summer- and fall-run chinook were once abundant in the Yakima River Basin, but the runs were decimated as a result of historical land and water development and fisheries management practices.

Last updated: Tue, 02/25/2014

Xapnish Property - Toppenish Creek

Last updated: Mon, 10/21/2013

Yakama Reservation Watersheds Project