Yakama Nation Fisheries Projects

Industrial and agricultural pollution and toxic contamination, dams that block fish migration and access to spawning habitat—the decline of salmon, steelhead, sturgeon, and lamprey in the Columbia River is has many causes. To restore the river and the life that depends upon it, the Yakama Nation Fisheries is employing many and varied strategies, simultaneously. In some areas, habitat recovery is the key; in others, supplementation of salmon runs may need to be the driver.

Last updated: Fri, 06/28/2019

The 8 Mile Ranch Project (8 Mile Ranch) restores habitat and hydraulic refuge for fish rearing and holding within one reach of the Chewuch River.

Last updated: Fri, 06/28/2019

In Washington, the White-headed Woodpecker (Picoides albolarvatus) is listed as a species of concern because of its association with old-growth ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forests. In 2011, we began a color-marking study of

Last updated: Fri, 06/28/2019

Woodpeckers are considered keystone species because of their broad effects on other species.

Last updated: Fri, 06/28/2019

Yakama Nation Fisheries (YNF) has been exploring sturgeon culture requirements by rearing small numbers of white sturgeon in tribal hatchery facilities since the 1990s.  Fish were obtained from various sources, including the private Pelfrey sturge

Last updated: Fri, 06/28/2019

Lincoln Meadows is a headwaters meadow for Toppenish Creek. Headwater meadows are important because they contain culturally important first foods and function as water storage to maintain summer base flows in streams, which supports aquatic life.

Last updated: Fri, 06/28/2019

The proposed Goodfellow/Chotzen Floodplain Reconnection Project (Sunnyslope side channel) utilizes natural processes to restore floodpl

Last updated: Fri, 06/28/2019

This project created a logjam habitat feature to stabilize approximately 800 feet of eroding left bank on the Lower Wenatchee River.

Last updated: Fri, 06/28/2019

This fish habitat enhancement project recreates habitat that is below historical and potential conditions.

Last updated: Fri, 06/28/2019

Agency Creek enters Simcoe Creek at river mile 9.5, and drains a 23-square-mile watershed. Middle Columbia River steelhead use the creek for spawning and rearing.

Last updated: Fri, 06/28/2019

On August 6, 2011, Yakama Nation Fisheries, Yakama Reservation Watersheds Project (YRWP) completed the implementation of a restoration action at two road/stream interfaces on Panther Creek to improve stream function and facilitate fish movement.