Yakama Nation Fisheries Projects

Industrial and agricultural pollution and toxic contamination, dams that block fish migration and access to spawning habitat—the decline of salmon, steelhead, sturgeon, and lamprey in the Columbia River is has many causes. To restore the river and the life that depends upon it, the Yakama Nation Fisheries is employing many and varied strategies, simultaneously. In some areas, habitat recovery is the key; in others, supplementation of salmon runs may need to be the driver.

Last updated: Tue, 05/12/2020

The Yakama Nation Fisheries is seeking proposals from qualified engineering firms to award an engineering services contract in support of salmon habitat restoration activities taking place in the Twisp River in Okanogan County, Washington.  Based

Last updated: Mon, 05/11/2020

Last updated: Thu, 05/07/2020

Last updated: Mon, 05/04/2020

The Yakama Nation Fisheries is seeking proposals from qualified engineering firms to award an engineering services contract in support of salmon habitat restoration activities taking place in Nason Creek in Chelan County, Washington.  Based upon t

Last updated: Mon, 05/04/2020


Last updated: Tue, 04/28/2020

By the end of the 20th century, indigenous natural coho salmon no longer occupied the mid- and upper-Columbia river basins. Columbia River coho salmon populations were decimated in the early 1900s.

Last updated: Tue, 04/28/2020

***April 24, 2020 - UPDATE:  

Last updated: Mon, 04/27/2020

Columbia River steelhead are iteroparous (able to spawn multiple times). However, as post-spawned steelhead (kelts) attempt to migrate downstream to return to the ocean, their survival is adversely affected by major dams.