Yakama Nation Fisheries Projects

Industrial and agricultural pollution and toxic contamination, dams that block fish migration and access to spawning habitat—the decline of salmon, steelhead, sturgeon, and lamprey in the Columbia River is has many causes. To restore the river and the life that depends upon it, the Yakama Nation Fisheries is employing many and varied strategies, simultaneously. In some areas, habitat recovery is the key; in others, supplementation of salmon runs may need to be the driver.

Last updated: Fri, 05/06/2016

This report presents the findings of the Nason Creek Recreation Assessment.  The goal of this study is to support the work of the Yakama Nation and partners as they continue to seek ways to balance the ecological benefits of habitat restoration pr

Last updated: Tue, 02/25/2014

Xapnish Property - Toppenish Creek

Last updated: Mon, 10/21/2013

Yakama Reservation Watersheds Project

Last updated: Thu, 08/29/2013
Last updated: Wed, 08/28/2013

In 2009, the Yakama Nation  procured field investigations and analyses for fish habitat project alternatives for Reach 3-D of the Entia

Last updated: Mon, 04/08/2013

Last updated: Mon, 04/08/2013

The White-headed Woodpecker (Picoides albolarvatus) is uncommon and non-migratory throughout its geographic range in Washington, where it inhabits forests dominated by ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa).

Last updated: Wed, 03/06/2013

The Klickitat Watershed Enhancement Project (KWEP) focuses on restoration, enhancement and protection of aquatic habitats in the Klickitat River and its tributaries to support native anadromous fish production.

Last updated: Wed, 03/06/2013

Renchler’ Meadow is an important water storage area for Dry Creek, a tributary of Satus Creek, both of which support culturally important fish species.